Home » Collaboration » 18 Sure-Fire Cures for Boring Webinar Presentations

18 Sure-Fire Cures for Boring Webinar Presentations

Are you guilty of boring your webinar attendees—or know someone who is? Webinar presentations can be powerful tools for building community, establishing thought leadership and even nurturing sales leads, if they’re done right. And 99% of the time (totally unscientific percentage, by the way, but sure feels right!) webinars are done oh-so-wrong.

Please, for the health and well-being of business people everywhere, only YOU can prevent soul-sucking webinars!

18 simple, sure-fire cures to heal your boring webinar presentations:

  1. Deliver what you promise. Avoid ticking off your guests by giving them what they signed up for.
  2. No sales pitches. I’m talking to you, corporate sponsors. Help webinar attendees improve their lives, not your pocketbook. (That comes later, if you play your cards—and your value message—right.)
  3. Choose download-free webinar technology. Seamless entry means your guests are happy when they join.
  4. Avoid slide overload like the plague. Choose powerful images, not copy-heavy, bulleted death-by-slide deck.
  5. Treat your slide decks like your sidekicks—not your teleprompter. Please, please, please, never, ever, ever, read directly from your slides. Please.

  6. Short and sweet, people! A single presenter should speak for a maximum 20 minutes. Anything more than that is snooze-city.
  7. Dangle the carrot. Avoid early exits by promising goodies if they stay to the end of the webinar.
  8. Ban boring. Choose webinar presenters based on their public speaking prowess, not their titles.
  9. Opt for a panel. Multiple presenters who engage in point-counterpoint repartee make longer webinars engaging for your attendees.
  10. We all love freebies. Ever 5-10 minutes, pull an attendees’ name from a hat and send them schwag. Guaranteed to hold their attention to the very end, as long as the schwag is GREAT schwag. Plus, schwag is really fun to say.
  11. Poll ‘em. Use polling features built into the webinar or webcasting technology to boost engagement and make them feel like they’re contributing to the story you’re telling.

  12. Brand it, don’t spray it. Use technology that allows you to subtly, but beautifully brand the webinar, so you don’t have to sell to them directly. They know who you are!
  13. Be honest in Q&A. If you don’t know that answer, just own it! Promise to follow-up with your answer after the event, and post the answer where all the attendees can find it, like a blog or community.
  14. Start and end with a bang. Start your webinar story with a disruptive insight and end with an inspirational, “we can do it” sentiment.
  15. Let ‘em see your pretty face. Turn on your webcam for a <90% increase in communication effectiveness. (That is a scientific factoid, thank you very much – check out the source here.)
  16. Smile, for heaven’s sake. No one wants to hang out with a Gloomy Gus. Make them like you by showing a little teeth—just not too much teeth!

  17. Reel ‘em in. Engaging content in after-webinar follow-up guides your webinar attendees down the nurture funnel. Just make sure you remember tip #2! Value for them, not hard sell for you!
  18. Elicit real feedback. Get serious about the attendee experience in every webinar. Always work to get better by surveying attendees and using their insights to hone your presentation.

Just can’t get enough presentation content? Me, either! Lucky for us, the awesome “Little Black Book of Presentation Ideas” is free for everyone reading this blog today. Get it here: http://bit.ly/presentationideasebook.

What is your #19 webinar presentation tip? Have an upcoming webinar you want to share with fellow presentation junkies? Share it in the comments below or tweet us @PGi or @blakelyags (that’s me!).

About Blakely Thomas-Aguilar

Blakely is a work-life juggler with three little monsters, Sci-Fi/Fantasy Book-a-holic, Atlanta transplant and PR/social/content strategist (and presentations nerd) for PGi.

Check Also

4 Key Elements to a Successful BYOD Policy

The use of handheld devices in the enterprise setting has increased in recent years. Smartphone …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *