overcoming presentation fears

For many employees, giving presentations at work is almost as horrifying as walking into Michael Myers in the break room.

What workers often fear most about presentations is a lack of audience engagement. Crickets, hecklers and zombie eyes can be terrifying when nothing matters more than persuading, convincing or inspiring your audience.

In fact, the ability to tell a story and engage the audience ranks higher among presentation fears than stage fright, according to a recent survey by BoldPoint Now, a presentation training firm.

Since you can’t transform into a brilliant Steve Jobs or a hilarious Louis C.K. when you’re in the spotlight, what can you do to keep them interested? You can overcome one of your biggest presentation fears through technology.

Maximize Engagement With Technology

The right technology, used the right way, revolutionizes your presentations from boring to breathtaking, stale to stirring.

• Can’t think of a good opening line? Grab their attention with a whopping photo of something unusual, striking or hilarious.
• Smart uses of fonts, colors and themes help you convey a mood without having to put on your best Jerry Maguire impersonation.
• Infographics are your best friend for presentations since 65 percent of people are visual learners, according to a Forbes article. Visualizing your data also offers the audience evidence and gives you cred on what you’re discussing.
• Who said presentations should live in PowerPoint? Dazzle your audience with something different using simple technology like Haiku Deck or Animoto.
• When you want to really engage your audience, use technology to invite audience participation. Incorporate social media with a webinar hashtag, or use virtual idea boards as interactive elements during online meetings.

Stop Fearing Technology Blunders

The right tools prevent technical glitches, as well, and act as a lifesaver for those that fear using technology in front of an audience.

Reliable, quality web conferencing and webinar tools eliminate the “what ifs,” and user-friendly, intuitive features help even the self-proclaimed tech illiterate feel confident while presenting.

When you’ve got better audio quality, you don’t have to worry about static or dropped calls interfering with your flow, and no one needs messy pass codes, slow downloads or complicated buttons to mess with their presentation vibe.

But to truly harness the power of technology for killer presentations, you need a set of best practices to prevent tech toys from turning presentations into digital disasters.